Keren R. McGinityMarrying Out: Jewish Men, Intermarriage, and Fatherhood

Indiana University Press, 2014

by Jason Schulman on February 8, 2016

Keren R. McGinity

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In Marrying Out: Jewish Men, Intermarriage, and Fatherhood (Indiana University Press, 2014), Keren R. McGinity, founding director of the Love and Tradition Institute and a Research Associate at Brandeis University, seeks to challenge the common assumption that when American Jewish men intermarry, they and their families are "lost" to the Jewish religion.  McGinity explores the challenges and expectations intermarried Jewish men face as they strive to be good husbands and to raise their children Jewish.  Her analysis reminds us more broadly that "gendered" studies should look at women and men's experiences.

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